June 7, 2020

A SERVICE OF CELEBRATION FOR 125 YEARS WITHIN THIS PLACE OF WORSHIP

A SERVICE OF CELEBRATION FOR 125 YEARS WITHIN THIS PLACE OF WORSHIP

Call to Worship
As you therefore have received Christ Jesus the Lord, continue to live your lives in him, rooted and built up in him and established in the faith, just as you were taught, abounding in thanksgiving

O GOD, OUR HELP IN AGES PAST
OUR HOPE FOR YEARS TO COME
OUR SHELTER FROM THE STORMY BLAST
AND OUR ETERNAL HOME

UNDER THE SHADOW OF THY THRONE
THY SAINTS HAVE DWELT SECURE
SUFFICIENT IS THINE ARM ALONE
AND OUR DEFENCE IS SURE

O GOD, OUR HELP IN AGES PAST
OUR HOPE FOR YEARS TO COME
STILL BE OUR GUARD WHILE TROUBLES LAST
AND OUR ETERNAL HOME
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A Prayer for the Family of God:

Almighty God, we, your people, offer you grateful thanks for this time of refreshment in the midst of our busy lives.
May we, in the quiet and peace of this moment, lay before you ourselves, our hearts, our lives, to do with as you will.
Take from us the cares and worries of our world and let us learn from the beauty we see around us, to trust in your eternal goodness and strength.
Be present among us now. Amen

I AM SO GLAD THAT OUR FATHER IN HEAVEN
TELLS OF HIS LOVE IN THE BOOK HE HAS GIVEN
WONDERFUL THINGS IN THE BIBLE I SEE
THIS IS THE DEAREST THAT JESUS LOVES ME
I AM SO GLAD THAT JESUS LOVES ME, JESUS LOVES ME, JESUS LOVES ME
I AM SO GLAD THAT JESUS LOVES ME, JESUS LOVES EVEN ME.

THOUGH I FORGET HIM, AND WANDER AWAY
STILL HE DOTH LOVE ME WHEREVER I STRAY
BACK TO HIS DEAR LOVING ARMS WOULD I FLEE
WHEN I REMEMBER THAT JESUS LOVES ME
I AM SO GLAD THAT JESUS LOVES ME, JESUS LOVES ME, JESUS LOVES ME
I AM SO GLAD THAT JESUS LOVES ME, JESUS LOVES EVEN ME.
CCLI: 1963748

THE EARLY YEARS: 1857-1899

In 1857, Presbyterians in Winchester began holding services in a log schoolhouse and later in a barn erected by Mr. John Christie. A Catechist, Mr. James Thom, came and stayed for 6 months during which time he conducted services of worship and baptized 2 persons.
In 1858, Mr. Kennedy joined the group, and the first church building was erected. It was known as the “White Church.” Music was led by a Precentor with a tuning fork until an organ was installed which upset one of the elders.

While in their first building, the congregation was served by the Rev. Andrew Rowat from 1871-1884; the Rev. Dr. P.C. Moffatt from 1885-1888; and the Rev. M.H. Scott from 1890-1893. It was while Rev. Scott was the minister that St. Paul’s Ladies Aid met officially for the first time.
The Rev. D.G.S. Connery was inducted in 1893. Noting that the congregation was outgrowing their building, the Rev. Connery encouraged them to build a new facility. On Wednesday, August 8th, 1894, the cornerstone was laid. The old church building was sold to the Wesleyans and the congregation worshipped in the Baptist church until the new building was completed. Dedication of the new church building took place on June 2nd, 1895. Rev. Connery stayed with the congregation until 1899.

JESUS, WHERE’ER THY PEOPLE MEET
THERE THEY BEHOLD THY MERCY SEAT
WHERE’ER THEY SEEK THEE THOU ART FOUND
AND EVERY PLACE IS HALLOWED GROUND
LORD, WE ARE FEW, BUT THOU ART NEAR
NOR SHORT THINE ARM, NOR DEAF THINE EAR
O REND THE HEAVENS, COME QUICKLY DOWN
AND MAKE A THOUSAND HEARTS THINE OWN.
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A Reading from 1st Chronicles 29:5b, 7-9, 10-12a, 14, 16-18, 20

David said: “Who then will offer willingly, consecrating themselves today to the LORD?”
Then the people made their freewill offerings…. They gave for the service of the house of God 5,000 talents and 10,000 darics of gold, 10,000 talents of silver, 18,000 talents of bronze, and 100,000 talents of iron. Whoever had precious stones gave them to the treasury of the house of the LORD, into the care of Jehiel the Gershonite. Then the people rejoiced because these had given willingly, for with single mind they had offered freely to the LORD…..
Then David blessed the LORD in the presence of all the assembly; David said: “Blessed are you, O LORD, the God of our ancestor Israel, forever and ever. Yours, O LORD, are the greatness, the power, the glory, the victory, and the majesty; for all that is in the heavens and on earth is yours; yours is the kingdom, O LORD, and you are exalted as head above all. Riches and honor come from you, and you rule over all…. But who am I, and what is my people, that we should be able to make this freewill offering? For all things come from you, and of your own have we given you…..
“O LORD our God, all this abundance that we have provided for building you a house for your holy name comes from your hand and is all your own. I know, my God, that you search the heart, and take pleasure in uprightness; in the uprightness of my heart I have freely offered all these things, and now I have seen your people, who are present here, offering freely and joyously to you.
O LORD, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, our ancestors, keep forever such purposes and thoughts in the hearts of your people, and direct their hearts toward you.”
Then David said to the whole assembly, “Bless the LORD your God.” And all the assembly blessed the Lord, the God of their ancestors, and bowed their heads and prostrated themselves before the LORD.

NEW LIFE IN A NEW BUILDING: 1899-1913

The Rev. E.S. Logie was inducted in 1899 and served until 1905. In an excerpt from the Annual Report of 1902, it was noted by the minister that the church was growing with membership at 224. In addition to an active Sabbath School – old name for Sunday School – there was an active Young People’s Society as well as a Women’s Foreign Missionary Society (W.F.M.S.) and a Women’s Missionary Society (W.M.S.)
Later that same year, an organ recital was held on Tuesday evening, December 1st by Mr. R. J. Devey featuring the music of Handel, Mendelssohn and Mozart among others.
The Rev. George Yule was inducted in 1906 and served until 1913. By 1910 the Sabbath School was now being referred to as the Sunday School and the Young People’s Society was now known as the Young People’s Guild with a membership of 38.
By 1913 a Mission Band had been established with the purpose of teaching children about missions and raising funds for projects. A choir was mentioned for the first time. Other activities included a Wednesday night prayer meeting.

SOWING IN THE MORNING, SOWING SEEDS OF KINDNESS
SOWING IN THE NOON-TIDE AND THE DEWY EVES
WAITING FOR THE HARVEST AND THE TIME OF REAPING
WE SHALL COME REJOICING, BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES
BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES, BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES
WE SHALL COME REJOICING BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES

SOWING IN THE SUNSHINE, SOWING IN THE SHADOWS
FEARING NEITHER CLOUDS NOR WINTER’S CHILLING BREEZE
BY AND BY THE HARVEST AND THE LABOUR ENDED
WE SHALL COME REJOICING, BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES.
BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES, BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES
WE SHALL COME REJOICING BRINGING IN THE SHEAVES
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RESPONSIVE PSALM – Psalm 100

Make a joyful noise to the Lord, all the earth
Worship the LORD with gladness; come into his presence with singing
Know that the LORD is God. It is he that made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.
Enter his gates with thanksgiving, and his courts with praise. Give thanks to him, bless his name.
For the LORD is good; his steadfast love endures forever, and his faithfulness to all generations

THE WAR YEARS: 1914-1918

In late 1913, the Rev. J.B. McLeod joined the congregation as minister. During the war years a number of people from the congregation volunteered for active service. For those who stayed behind life continued with active groups such as: The choir (practicing on Friday evenings), Young People’s Guild, Mission Band (re-organized), the W.M.S. and Ladies’ Aid as well as a minister’s Bible Class held on Sunday afternoons

THE CHURCH’S ONE FOUNDATION IS JESUS CHRIST HER LORD
SHE IS HIS NEW CREATION BY WATER AND THE WORD
FROM HEAVEN HE CAME AND SOUGHT HER
TO BE HIS HOLY BRIDE
WITH HIS OWN BLOOD HE BOUGHT HER
AND FOR HER LIFE HE DIED.

YET SHE ON EARTH HATH UNION WITH GOD THE THREE IN ONE
AND MYSTIC SWEET COMMUNION WITH THOSE WHOSE REST IS WON
O HAPPY ONES AND HOLY!
LORD, GIVE US GRACE THAT WE, LIKE THEM, THE MEEK AND LOWLY
ON HIGH MAY DWELL WITH THEE.
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A Reading from 1stCorinthians 13:1-10, 12-13 – The Gift of Love

If I speak in the tongues of mortals and of angels, but do not have love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give away all my possessions, and if I hand over my body so that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.
Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice in wrongdoing but rejoices in the truth. It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.
Love never ends. But as for prophecies, they will come to an end; as for tongues, they will cease; as for knowledge, it will come to an end. For we know only in part, and we prophesy in part; but when the complete comes, the partial will come to an end. For now, we see in a mirror, dimly, but then we will see face to face. Now I know only in part; then I will know fully, even as I have been fully known. And now faith, hope and love abide, these three; and the greatest of these is love.

POST WAR YEARS: 1918-1929

In 1918 the Rev. J.M. Glassford was inducted as the minister. He stayed until 1925.
During his time the Mission Band received a new name – the “Sunbeam Mission Band.”
It should also be noted that in 1920, the congregation’s requirement for what we now know as Presbyterians sharing was set at $1,200. The goal was met and a new goal of $1,400 was set for 1921.
During his years with the congregation, the Rev. Glassford had a Minister’s Message included in the annual reports. In 1923 he wrote these words:
Let each member of St. Paul’s church be –
A daily advertisement of the Christian Religion
A shining light in the home, church. Business and circles of friendship
A prayerful and regular worshipper at every Lord’s Day service, asking God’s blessing on your minister in his efforts to be the interpreter of God’s whole programme of life for his children
A close companion of Jesus Christ, a hard worker in the Master’s vineyard, and an enthusiastic contributor
A devout enough Christian to be a believer in standards of praying and of living that will be sufficiently high to strongly demand his or her vital faith and constant effort.
Thus shall we all be his witnesses.
In the annual report for 1924, written in January 1925, mention was made of the vote on church union. The vote at St. Paul’s was 154 against union and 33 for union. The unrest caused by the debate over church union led to a decrease in contributions to the national church.
In 1925, the Rev. C.J. Graham was inducted. In his pastoral letter of 1927, he writes in part: “In fairness to those who minister and those who are ministered unto, be diligent and faithful in your attendance at Divine worship. Lack of the practice of attendance certainly will develop a lack of interest. Be fair to yourself.” He goes on to encourage members to remember to be generous givers of their time and talents.

COME, THOU FOUNT OF EVERY BLESSING
TUNE MY HEART TO SING THY GRACE
STREAMS OF MERCY NEVER CEASING
CALL FOR SONGS OF LOUDEST PRAISE
WITH CELESTIAL FERVOUR GLOWING
LET ME SING LIKE THOSE ABOVE
WHILE MY HEART, WITH JOY O’ERFLOWING
DWELLS ON GOD’S UNCHANGING LOVE.
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THE DEPRESSION YEARS: 1930-1939
On November 8th, 1929 the Rev. W.D. Turner was inducted as minister to both St. Paul’s in Winchester and to the church in Winchester Springs. It was also a challenging time as a number of families had left Winchester to seek work.
In 1930 the church was closed for 3 Sundays – not due to bad weather but for refurbishing the sanctuary. The Ladies’ Aid were responsible for paying for the beautification.
In 1931, the minister noted in his report the wonderful work of the Choir, its efficient leader and its dedicated members.
By 1933 the effects of the Depression were being felt by the church as offerings declined. It was noted that there were 12 less paying members and adherents.
In the summer of 1935, the Presbyterian and Baptist churches shared services. Not sure how long this went on.
For Christmas of that year, the Senior and Junior choirs presented 2 Cantatas which were thoroughly enjoyed and appreciated.

WE GIVE THEE BUT THINE OWN
WHATE’ER THE GIFT MAY BE
ALL THAT WE HAVE IS THINE ALONE
A TRUST, O LORD, FROM THEE

MAY WE THY BOUNTIES THUS AS STEWARDS TRUE RECEIVE
AND GLADLY, AS THOU BLESSEST US
TO THEE OUR FIRST-FRUITS GIVE.

AND WE BELIEVE THY WORD, THOUGH DIM OUR FAITH MAY BE
WHATE’ER FOR THINE WE DO, O LORD,
WE DO IT UNTO THEE.
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SECOND WORLD WAR: 1939-1945

1940 saw the departure of the Rev. Turner.
During the vacancy, the congregation was well served by students from the colleges.
The choir was particularly active at this time – raising funds for a new organ and enjoying a number of social activities as well as regular Friday night practices.
The Junior choir is now 4 years old and they presented 2 cantatas. One at Easter called “Easter Bells” and one at Christmas called “The Christ of Bethlehem.”
Always quite active in mission work, another group made its appearance in 1940. The Goforth Helper’s Group. This group was inspired by the real-life missionaries to China from the Presbyterian Church – John & Rosalind Goforth
In later 1941, the Rev. Wallace MacKinnon was inducted into the charge.
1942 marked the first year of the Agnes Glassford Auxiliary – a mission group named in memory of the Rev. Glassford’s wife.
1944 saw the start of a Men’s Fellowship Club with the Rev. MacKinnon as President and Hugh Wilson as secretary. It was also noted that attendance at morning services was far better than in the evenings.

ALL THE WAY MY SAVIOUR LEADS ME; WHAT HAVE I TO ASK BESIDE?
CAN I DOUBT HIS TENDER MERCY WHO THROUGH LIFE HAS BEEN MY GUIDE?
HEAVENLY PEACE, DIVINEST COMFORT, HERE BY FAITH IN HIM TO DWELL
FOR I KNOW, WHATE’ER BEFALL ME, JESUS DOETH ALL THINGS WELL.

ALL THE WAY MY SAVIOUR LEADS ME, CHEERS EACH WINDING PATH I TREAD
GIVES ME GRACE FOR EVERY TRIAL, FEEDS ME WITH THE LIVING BREAD
THOUGH MY WEARY STEPS MAY FALTER, AND MY SOUL ATHIRST MAY BE
GUSHING FROM THE ROCK BEFORE ME, LO, A SPRING OF JOY I SEE!

ALL THE WAY MY SAVIOUR LEADS ME, O THE FULNESS OF HIS LOVE
PERFECT REST TO ME IS PROMISED IN MY FATHER’S HOUSE ABOVE
WHEN MY SPIRIT, CLOTHED, IMMORTAL, WINGS ITS FLIGHT TO REALMS OF DAY
THIS MY SONG THROUGH ENDLESS AGES, ‘JESUS LED ME ALL THE WAY!’
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POST WAR: 1946-1955

With the departure of the Rev. Wallace MacKinnon in 1948 came the arrival of the Rev. Iver D. MacIver.
Joint summer services with the Baptists continued through this time.
In November of 1949, a Men & Missions Sunday was held. This event was repeated in 1950 but it appears that the Men’s Fellowship Group ended with the departure of Rev. MacKinnon.
It also appears that the Young People’s Guild had ceased to exist.
1951 saw the arrival of the Rev. William Reid as the minister of St. Paul’s.
It also saw the revival of the Young People’s Society and the start of the Young Couples’ Club with Presidents Mr. & Mrs. Robert Geggie and Vice-Presidents Mr. & Mrs. Lindsay Stewart.
Church membership at this time was reported at 115.
In 1953 churches celebrated a special service in honour of the coronation of Her Majesty the Queen on Sunday May 31st.
1954 saw the start of a C.G.I.T. group – that’s Canadian Girls in Training.
By 1955 it appears that both the Young People’s Society and the Young Couples’ Club were no longer active in the church

FORTH IN THY NAME O LORD I GO
MY DAILY LABOUR TO PURSUE
THEE, ONLY THEE, RESOLVED TO KNOW
IN ALL I THINK, OR SPEAK, OR DO.
GIVE ME TO BEAR THY EASY YOKE
AND EVERY MOMENT WATCH AND PRAY
AND STILL TO THINGS ETERNAL LOOK
AND HASTEN TO THY GLORIOUS DAY
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BABY BOOMERS: 1955-1965

On September 29th of 1955 the congregation welcomed a new minister – the Rev. Wm. Sutherland who would have one of the longest stays at St. Paul’s.
By this time the Goforth Helpers’ Group and C.G.I.T. do not appear to be active.
Mention is made once again of the Young People’s Society with its secretary Lorna Black.
In 1957 the congregation celebrated 100 years. 2 Anniversary Sundays were held with the Rev. Ronald Rowat conducting one service and the Rev. H.S. Rodney conducting the other. Both had family connections to the congregation.
In his report for the year ending 1958 the Clerk of Session Walter Moffat noted laxity on the part of some members with regard to the Sacrament of the Lord’s Supper. To help correct this the dates for communion in 1959 were included in his report. Members take note!
1958 also marked the first appearance of a C.O.C. group – Children of the Church. This was a midweek group for the younger children of the church.
On Sunday January 26th, 1958 the Carillonic Chimes were dedicated at an evening service.
By 1965 the church also had an Explorers group – a midweek group for older children. The Young People’s Society had become known as the Senior High Fellowship (P.Y.P.S.) and the choir was in desperate need of members to fill its ranks. It also saw the departure of the Rev. Wm. Sutherland.

SPECIAL MUSIC: What can you imagine? Words & Music by Rev. Bruce Kemp

TRANSITION YEARS: 1965-1986
1967 saw the arrival of a new minister, the Rev. Wm. C. Inglis. By this time membership had grown to 174.
For the third year in a row, a Cradle Report was given by Donna Wilson.
1970 saw the departure of the Rev. Inglis and the congregation searching for a new minister.
In 1971, the Rev. Ralph D. Neil was inducted. He was with the congregation for 3 years.
He was followed by the Rev. Earl Eaton who was with the congregation from 1974-1975.
In 1975, the Rev. Howard D. Smith was inducted. Church membership stood at 139.
An afternoon W.M.S. auxiliary group also is made mention of at this time.
On November 14th, 1982 the Rev. Smith resigned.
From that time until 1986, the pastoral charge remained vacant. It was served by 2 interim moderators: The Rev. Jack Urquhart from Cardinal, the Rev. Bert de Bruin from Chesterville and one Interim Minister, the Rev. Leslie Smith.

CONTEMPORARY TIMES: 1986 TO 2002

1986 saw the arrival of the Rev. Ian Johnston who served the congregation until 1991.
In 1992 the congregation welcomed the Rev. Heather Jones. During her time with the congregation, she held a Dream Days event at which time members were invited to let their imaginations soar. Many good thoughts and ideas came from it. This year the Ladies’ Aid revived an event that Heather started when they held a Valentine’s Strawberry Social in February.
After Heather’s departure in 1998, the congregation received 2 Interim Ministers: The Rev. Marion Johnston in 1998 and the Rev. John Crowdis in 1999.
In the year 2000, the Rev. Carol Bain was inducted. But just 2 years later a change came that rocked the congregation.
Difficult years followed which saw 2 Interim Moderators and 2 Interim Ministers.

THE REV. IAN JOHNSTON – REFLECTIONS AND MEMORIES
Taking time to look back on my journey in life and in ministry, it is nice to reflect on the sojourn of our family’s time in Winchester. Thank you for inviting me to do this.
In the summer of 1985 I was contacted by the Reverends Bert de Bruijn and Tijs Theijsmeijer, two ministers of the old Brockville Presbytery who had heard that I might be considering to relocate due to changes in my personal life, and I was invited to consider applying to the vacancy.
We visited Winchester on the weekend of September 22, 1985 and were guests at the home of the Stel family. My sermon that weekend was from Ephesians 4: People with A Mission.
My induction service was January 12, 1986. My first sermon was from Isaiah 43:19: A Life Full of New Beginnings. Upon reflection, little did I know then how true the cornerstone of that sermon was to be.
In July, the congregation welcomed my wife June and our then blended family. Winchester was a wonderful community to raise our children. Four of them got jobs here while in High School and some of that learning has influenced them into their adult lives. Ken worked at Drurey’s and he continues today with a division of GM; Julie worked at Sweet Sisters and continues to do specialty baking for birthdays and weddings; Brian and Jason both got their start in Mary’s Restaurant and both still love to cook.
A few weeks after my arrival, both furnaces under the sanctuary were “Red Tagged”. Thankfully one of the members of the congregation was a friend of the local gas company representative and we were permitted to keep one furnace on while plans were made to find the funds to buy either one large furnace or two smaller units. Blessings came in many ways with volunteer talent that knew how to fit the new units up to the “old” ducting that some said dated back to the wood heating era.
It seemed for a time that the life of St. Paul’s congregation was fundraising and salvaging the building, one repair after another. The leadership of the day took the high road as they did not want to do patch-work remedies. This rallied the congregation so that every event, fund raiser and special offering requests brought in unbelievable responses. The building was a focal point, but the congregation spirit was central. Thus, very quickly, there was a new steel roof, the brick work was repaired from front to back and from the east wall to the west. The windows in the entire building were repaired as needed and at the same time a small company in Morrisburg supplied what was a relatively new window covering – Lexican plastic sheathing. As an interesting note here, at the same time, the General Assembly was debating if Presbyterian buildings in Canada might use the term, “cathedral”. Some people may recall that St. Paul’s was often, lovingly referred to as, St. Paul’s Cathedral.
The bell tower is almost a story of its own. The tower bell had gone out of alignment on its wood and metal rockers – but that was not to be a problem for long when a gentleman with an engineer from his firm recommended what turned out to be really a simple fix. It was wonderful to hear the bell ring out before worship, prior to funeral services, and at the conclusion of weddings. Boys and girls were eager to have their turn to learn how to ring the bell “smoothly”.
Also housed in the tower were speakers for the Schulrmerich Carillon. I do not know when the Carillon had ceased to work, but when someone learned of its presence, it was mutually decided to see
if it could be repaired and put into use again. It was discovered that there was a great wealth of bell music and carillon hymns. During the process, started first by local help, the sound system of the carillon was connected, and without intention, for about three weeks all the services were broadcast live to downtown Winchester (including the sermon). Eventually the carillon company from Pennsylvania was contacted and they sent a representative. Soon after the St. Paul’s tower rang out a verse or two of a favourite hymn every noon hour and during the day, gonged the hour of the day.
There was a retired schoolteacher who lived in care just west of town who loved St. Paul’s and had many happy memories from her youth. She had no kin and decided to provide funds to light up the east side and front of the sanctuary at night. She was glad to see the project completed before her passing.
At around the same time someone did some research on the pipe organ. As I remember the main body of the organ was sold during the 1930’s depression in order to keep the congregation going.
There were various stories as to which church in SW Ontario had bought the organ body, but none were confirmed, so far as I recall. The price to re-establish the pipe organ were prohibitive and the electric organ eventually got a tune-up.
I do not remember the exact date, but the village sesquicentennial encouraged a lot of downtown improvements. I was chairperson of the Parks and Recreation. For St. Paul’s the east entrance ramp was installed. Downtown, the sidewalks were re-laid with brick, new trees were planted.
The arena got an interior refurbishing which included all new safety glass at the ends of the rink. The ball diamonds got electric lighting for night games and a soccer pitch was built.
The community worship service welcomed George Beverly Shea. This was a wonderful service for the community and a welcome home for George. It was exciting for myself as I had got to know him when I had worked at some of the Crusades.
St. Paul’s was a vibrant part of the Winchester and District Ministerial. We worked as a co-operative, especially with St. Clare’s Anglican Church. Through this combine missional efforts an area food bank was established. The same spirit and leadership established the Home for Abused Women and their children. Both of these shared ministry efforts reached out and served individuals and families across South Dundas County.
I was asked if I had a metaphor for my time at St. Paul’s. Someone suggested that it might be as the title of both a book and a movie, The Flight of the Phoenix. I am not sure I ever quite saw it in that way at the time, but it was very satisfying to be the minister and pastor at St. Paul’s and in the Winchester community. Upon reflection, we did accomplish a lot as a small, faithful congregation. I do not have one specific Biblical verse, but I felt the congregation carried out a wonderful response to our Lord’s directive: Love one another as I have loved you. (John 13: 34-45)..
Some statistics from my time with you:
37 Baptisms - the youngest “0” a new-born and the oldest – age 47
69 Members and Confirmations
29 Weddings
56 Funerals
St. Paul’s was a generous and loving congregation. The people cared for each other and reached out at every opportunity to the Village and the County residents. Every time there was aspecial service hosted, we were excited when we had to open the doors at the rear of the sanctuary.
I, as your minister and pastor, June and our children will always cherish our time with St. Paul’s congregation. These are memories that will continue to bless us all the days of our lives. Thank you. God bless you and we pray St. Paul’s will have many more years of witness and celebration.
RENEWAL AND HOPE: 2002-PRESENT

In 2005, the congregation welcomed the Rev. Dr. Floyd McPhee. As Interim Minister, Floyd was instrumental in moving the congregation to see the possibilities for its future. Under his leadership the congregation entered a new pastoral relationship with congregations from Chesterville and Morewood.
In 2007 Interim Moderators, the Rev. Robert Martin and the Rev. James Ferrier were appointed. Their work led to induction of the present minister.
The resilience of this congregation is quite evident by the new growth that has occurred over the last 7 years. As one member put it: “We have our mojo back.”
125 years of ministry in this building has shown us one thing: No matter how much may change, the constant is the willingness of this community to be a witness to their faith.

THE REV. DR. FLOYD MCPHEE – REFLECTIONS
When we arrived in January 2005 to serve as an Interim Minister of the two-point charge of Mountain and St. Paul’s in Winchester, we found a people hurting, and a leadership in crisis. The strong Presbyterian tradition of shared ministry between pastor and the laity had not been honoured; consequently, division, turmoil and a lot of pain resulted. The Minister left and the congregation – minus a number of departing members – started to rebuild. Due to an exceptionally strong, committed, and talented core of members including a faithful Clerk of Session – Jorris Zubatuk – and committed Elders on Session, a hard-working Board of Managers, and a Ladies group restarted by Doris Baker, the congregation emerged stronger than ever. Eventually, the congregation was aligned with the Morewood and Chesterville congregations and was able to call Bruce as their fulltime Minister. I remember St. Paul’s as having a strong, engaged, and faithful core of leaders, who caused the congregation to thrive. I also remember the delicious dinners provided by Lyle Skuce and his helpers, the excellent musical leadership of Arlene Nesbitt and dedicated choir, and the very enjoyable Christmas Session parties hosted by Phyllis MacMaster.

I remember the time when I discovered a new way of evangelism. One Sunday morning, Claire was driving me to the next service of worship. I accidentally left my Bible with all my sermon notes in it on top of the car. As Claire took off, I looked at the side mirror of the car and I saw pages of my sermon notes littering the side of the road. A new way of evangelism, perhaps.

As one travels through life, you meet many exceptional people, and there are a few who stand out – people who love the Lord Jesus Christ and who faithfully serve him all their lives. I discovered one of those in the Winchester congregation. She was Evelyn Walker. Evelyn was born in Winchester Springs, went to Winchester High School and Ottawa Normal School. In 1943 she entered the Deaconess Missionary and Training School in Toronto. After graduation she served the church in Ontario, the Atlantic Provinces, the Prairies and in northern frontier areas. In 1952 she began extension work outside of Truro, Nova Scotia at McClure’s Mills. She visited every home in the community and invited children to a Sunday School which she started. Based on her work a congregation was established and a church building erected. That congregation is presently part of a two-point charge with St. James in Truro. Upon her retirement she resided in Winchester and was active in the church and in Presbytery and hosted a monthly Women’s Missionary Society meeting in her home. Claire and I attended those meetings for several years. It was said of her that her hospitality was ongoing and her generosity commendable. She was a positive person who offered words of encouragement to all she met. She strongly believed that all you did for Christ should be your best effort. Her constant faith in her Lord was an inspiration to all and her commitment to serving him never waned. It was my privilege to get to know her, to join her in the study of God’s word and in prayer.
These are some of my memories of my five years at St. Paul’s.

LORD, THE LIGHT OF YOUR LOVE IS SHINING
IN THE MIDST OF THE DARKNESS SHINING
JESUS, LIGHT OF THE WORLD, SHINE UPON US
SET US FREE BY THE TRUTH YOU NOW BRING US
SHINE ON ME, SHINE ON ME.
SHINE, JESUS, SHINE; FILL THIS LAND WITH THE FATHER’S GLORY
BLAZE, SPIRIT BLAZE, SET OUR HEARTS ON FIRE
FLOW, RIVER FLOW, FLOOD THE NATIONS WITH GRACE AND MERCY
SEND FORTH YOUR WORD, LORD, AND LET THERE BE LIGHT

LORD, I COME TO YOUR AWESOME PRESENCE,
FROM THE SHADOWS INTO YOUR RADIANCE
BY YOUR BLOOD I MAY ENTER YOUR BRIGHTNESS
SEARCH ME, TRY ME, CONSUME ALL MY DARKNESS
SHINE ON ME, SHINE ON ME
SHINE, JESUS, SHINE; FILL THIS LAND WITH THE FATHER’S GLORY
BLAZE, SPIRIT BLAZE, SET OUR HEARTS ON FIRE
FLOW, RIVER FLOW, FLOOD THE NATIONS WITH GRACE AND MERCY
SEND FORTH YOUR WORD, LORD, AND LET THERE BE LIGHT

AS WE GAZE ON YOUR KINGLY BRIGHTNESS
SO OUR FACES DISPLAY YOUR LIKENESS
EVER CHANGING FROM GLORY TO GLORY
MIRRORED HERE MAY OUR LIVES TELL YOUR STORY
SHINE ON ME, SHINE ON ME
SHINE, JESUS, SHINE; FILL THIS LAND WITH THE FATHER’S GLORY
BLAZE, SPIRIT BLAZE, SET OUR HEARTS ON FIRE
FLOW, RIVER FLOW, FLOOD THE NATIONS WITH GRACE AND MERCY
SEND FORTH YOUR WORD, LORD, AND LET THERE BE LIGHT
CCLI: 1963748

PRAYERS OF THE PEOPLE – THE LORD’S PRAYER

At our baptism we became sons and daughters of our God, disciples of his Son our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, and inheritors of the kingdom of heaven. We join together now in prayer.

Eternal God, Creator and Father of us all, when your Son Jesus Christ our Lord came to earth, he showed us by his many acts of caring that you are a compassionate and loving God.

OPEN OUR EYES, O LORD, THAT WE MAY SEE YOU MORE CLEARLY.

Eternal God, Creator and Father of us all, when your Son Jesus Christ our Lord came to earth, he taught us your love with words of wisdom and understanding.

OPEN OUR EARS, O LORD, THAT WE MIGHT HEAR YOU MORE CLEARLY.

Eternal God, Creator and Father of us all, when your Son Jesus Christ our Lord came to earth, he welcomed all who came to him, the rich and the poor, the Jew and the Gentile, the righteous and the sinner.

OPEN OUR HEARTS, O LORD, THAT WE MIGHT RECOGNIZE MEN AND WOMEN OF ALL RACES, COLOURS AND CREEDS AS OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS, AND LEARN TO LOVE WITHOUT DISCRIMINATION AND FEAR.

Eternal God, Creator and Father of us all, when your Son Jesus Christ our Lord came to earth, he gave his life on a cross of shame, that we might be free.

OPEN THE DOORWAY OF OUR SOULS, O LORD, THAT OUR SAVIOUR MAY ENTER AND WE MAY BE AT PEACE.

Eternal God, Creator and Father of us all, on a glorious morning three days after his crucifixion, your Son Jesus Christ defied the darkness of death and rose again to a new life.

OPEN OUR MINDS, O LORD, TO THIS WONDERFUL TRUTH, THAT WE MAY LIVE OUR LIVES WITHOUT FEAR, TRUSTING IN YOUR WORD AND REJOICING ALWAYS IN YOUR FAITHFULNESS.
Eternal God, Creator and Father of us all, we thank you for this wonderful world, for the ever-changing skies, the blessed winds, and the earth beneath our feet. And we thank you that your Son gave all of this life’s loveliness in sacrifice for us. In our turn, and in great humility, we offer our lives. All that we do and all that we say we give in joyful and willing service to you, our Lord and Heavenly King who taught us to pray, saying…

Our Father, who art in heaven. Hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come; thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory. Forever and ever. AMEN

Will you come and follow me if I but call your name?
Will you go where you don’t know and never be the same?
Will you let my love be shown, will you let my name be known?
Will you let my life be grown in you and you in me?

Will you leave yourself behind if I but call your name?
Will you care for cruel and kind and never be the same?
Will you risk the hostile stare should your life attract or scare?
Will you let me answer prayer in you and you in me?

Will you let the blinded see if I but call your name?
Will you set the prisoners free and never be the same?
Will you kiss the leper clean and do such as this unseen?
And admit to what I mean in you and you in me?
Will you love the “you” you hide if I but call your name?
Will you quell the fear inside and never be the same?
Will you use the faith you’ve found to reshape the world around,
Through my sight and touch and sound in you and you in me?

Lord, your summons echoes true when you but call my name.
Let me turn and follow you and never be the same.
In your company I’ll go where your love and footsteps show
Thus I’ll move and live and grow in you and you in me.
CCLI:1963748